Monday, September 28, 2009

Environmental issues take top billing today

Years ago, while sailing off Coast Rica, I saw something so amazing, I sometimes wonder if, having seen pictures of the event, I just dreamed I saw it. But Craig was there and confirms the facts: Floating in the water, looking like so many army helmets, were thousands of olive-green turtles, ranging as far as we could see. Unknowingly, we'd sailed into an arribada.

A group of environmental leaders is meeting in Honolulu this week to develop a national policy for protection of oceans and lakes.

An abandoned lay gillnet recently removed from Kane'ohe Bay contained a macabre catch of the dead and dying: a 3-foot blacktip shark, slipper lobsters, uhu, kala and other reef species, and a collection of fish skeletons.

The state's Environmental Council has suspended all further meetings until the state provides it with a staffer to take minutes and resources for Neighbor Island members to participate.

Preserving Kaua‘i’s natural habitats is “remarkably important,” said science and environmental blogger Jan TenBruggencate, who served as moderator for the Lihu‘e Business Association’s public forum this week.


With the economy unable to sprout out of its slump, more and more people are turning to sustainable agriculture.

An influx of commercial activity has clogged the streets of the popular Lanikai community and prompted some fed-up residents to seek restrictions on one of those activities: beach weddings.

State Rep. Joe Bertram stands out among his straight-laced peers: He's a Hawaii legislator who wears sandals, advocates medical marijuana and same-sex civil unions.

The streets were jammed and the musicians were jammin' as thousands partied, island-style, at the 16th KWXX Ho'olaule'a held Saturday night in downtown Hilo.

From the air, it was a ribbon-shaped sea of pink. From the ground, it was hundreds of Big Islanders attempting a Guinness World Record to raise breast cancer awareness.

A very big and costly pest has placed state lands, Hawaiian home lands, public and private watersheds, golf courses, parks, ranches, farms and home gardens under siege.