Friday, January 22, 2010

GOP seeks more school days, Mufi honored, big spenders could influence state congressional race, garbage still piling up, more top Hawaii news


Honolulu Mayor Mufi Hannemann on Thursday received the 2010 National Award for Local Arts Leadership from the Americans for the Arts and U.S. Conference of Mayors.


A U.S. Supreme Court decision yesterday opened a new path for corporations and unions to influence federal elections in Hawaii.

Public school bus routes, which were cut back in November, will be reduced further next school year and the fare may climb to $1 from 75 cents.

The war of words is escalating over private bus service for public school students. Caught in the middle are parents, students and school administrators. 


Mandating a minimum number of instructional days for public school students would take furloughs off the table in contract negotiations and get students back in school, Republican House members contend.

Late February to early March, that is the new deadline for shipping thousands of tons of Hawaii's trash to the mainland. But that also means the stacks of bales of rubbish will sit in Campbell Industrial Park more than month before the trash sets sail.

More than 400 East Hawaii medical workers may be affected by a series of workday furloughs OK'd by a state arbitration panel last week.

Despite the sour economy, commercial garbage haulers are chipping away at their past-due bills to Hawaii County government.

The state Campaign Spending Commission has fined Don Couch $375 for exceeding the cap on nonresident campaign contributions in his 2008 Maui County Council campaign

State Senate Democrats have the votes to pass a civil-unions bill as soon as today, but are not certain they have the two-thirds' majority necessary to override a potential veto or whether they should amend the bill to correct a technical flaw.

Kevin Rebelo and Frank Miholer own a wedding company, and they say they've married more than 4,000 heterosexual couples since 1994

Civilian contractors assigned to U.S. Navy vessels at Port Allen sprung into action recently when they observed a 30-foot fishing boat sunk at its moorings at Port Allen Small Boat Harbor.